7 Black Female Thought Leaders History Books Ignore - Atlanta Black Star

(Source: ohmeohlife)

lesleypowers:

No but seriously stop

lesleypowers:

No but seriously stop

(via girl-farts)

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie: The danger of a single story | Video on TED.com

orkideh84:

We should all be feminists - Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie at TEDxEuston (by TEDxTalks)

Powerful

We teach girls shame. Close your legs, cover yourself, we make them feel as though being born female they’re already guilty of something. As so, girls grow up to be women who cannot say they have desire. They grow up to be women who silence themselves. They grow to be women who cannot say what they truly think. And they grow up - and this is the worst thing we do to girls - they grow up to be women who have turned pretense into an art form.

Chimamamda Ngozi Adiche (via trellbrennan)
fuckyeahtessie:

Saw this in Brooklyn.

fuckyeahtessie:

Saw this in Brooklyn.

It is a curious dilemma to observe the paradox that on the one hand the female body is the primary metaphor for sexuality, its use saturates advertising, art and the mainstream erotic imaginary. Yet, the clitoris, the true female sexual organ, is virtually invisible.

Sophia Wallace, creator of Cliteracy (via muffdiver)

(Source: The Huffington Post, via muffdiver)

(Source: mykaylaevans)

When ordinary people wake up, elites begin to tremble in their boots. They can’t get away with their abuse. They can’t get away with subjugation. They can’t get away with exploitation. They can’t get away with domination. It takes courage for folk to stand up.

Cornel West, Hope on a Tightrope (via existenti-al)

(Source: bourgeoisentimentality)

White privilege is the power to feel bad but not be accountable for the policies in place. It is the power to believe that this is about individual choices, and not a system of advantaging one group over others. It is the ability to blame the group suffering from persistently poor outcomes for creating those outcomes, by ignoring the systemic ways in which some groups are oppressed and some are not.

Flipping the Script: White Privilege and Community Building (via the-unibombest)

(Source: the-unabombest)

We have not ended racial caste in America; we have merely redesigned it.

Michelle Alexander, The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration (via culturedecay)

(Source: culturedecay)

womenwhokickass:

Keiko Fukuda: Why she kicks ass
She was a martial artist, who was the highest-ranked female judoka in history, holding the rank of 9th dan from the Kodokan and the United States Judo Federation (USJF), and 10th dan from USA Judo, as well as being the last surviving student of Kanō Jigorō, founder of judo.
She was a renowned pioneer of women’s judo, being the first woman promoted to 6th dan (c. 1972), and later 9th dan (2006), by the Kodokan. She is also the first and, so far, only woman to have been promoted to 10th dan in the art.
After completing her formal education in Japan, Fukuda visited the United States of America to teach in the 1950s and 1960s, and eventually settled there. She continued to teach her art in the San Francisco Bay Area until her death in 2013.
Fukuda, standing at only 4’ 11” (150 cm) and weighing less than 100 lb. (45 kg), became a judo instructor in 1937. She also earned a degree in Japanese literature from Showa Women’s University.
In 1953, she was promoted to the rank of 5th dan in judo. She traveled to the United States of America later that year, at the invitation of a judo club in Oakland, California, and stayed for almost two years before returning to Japan. Fukuda next traveled to the US in 1966, giving seminars in California. At that time, she was one of only four women in the world ranked at 5th dan in judo, and was one of only two female instructors at the Kodokan (the other being Masako Noritomi, also ranked 5th dan).
 In 1966, she demonstrated her art at Mills College, and the institution immediately offered her a teaching position; she accepted, and taught there from 1967 to 1978.
Around 1972, following a letter campaign against the rule prohibiting women from being promoted higher than 5th dan, Fukuda became the first woman promoted to 6th dan by the Kodokan. In 1973, she published Born for the Mat: A Kodokan kata textbook for women, an instructional book for women about the kata (patterns) of Kodokan judo.
In 1974, she established the annual Joshi Judo Camp to give female judo practitioners the opportunity to train together. That year, she was one of only three women in the world ranked 6th dan in judo.
In 1990, she was awarded Japan’s Order of the Sacred Treasure, 4th Class (Gold Rays with Rosette), and the United States Judo Incorporated (USJI) Henry Stone Lifetime Contribution to American Judo Award.
She served as a technical adviser for US Women’s Judo and the USJI Kata Judges’ Certification Sub-committee, as a National Kata Judge, was a faculty member of the USJI National Teachers’ Institute, a member of the USJF Promotion Committee, a member of the USJF and USJI Women’s Sub-committee.
In 2001, she was awarded a rare red belt (marking 9th dan rank) in judo by the USJF for her lifelong contribution to the art. On January 8, 2006, at its annual New Year’s Kagami Biraki celebration, the Kodokan promoted Fukuda to the rank of 9th dan—the first time it had awarded this rank to a woman. On July 28, 2011, the promotion board of USA Judo awarded Fukuda the rank of 10th dan.
Fukuda continued to teach judo three times each week, host the annual Fukuda Invitational Kata Championships, and teach at the annual Joshi Judo Camp until her death, at the age of 99, in San Francisco, California. 
She established the Keiko Fukuda Judo Scholarship to encourage and enable women to continue their formal training in the art. Apart from teaching in the USA, she also taught in Australia, Canada, France, Norway and the Philippines.

womenwhokickass:

Keiko Fukuda: Why she kicks ass

  • She was a martial artist, who was the highest-ranked female judoka in history, holding the rank of 9th dan from the Kodokan and the United States Judo Federation (USJF), and 10th dan from USA Judo, as well as being the last surviving student of Kanō Jigorō, founder of judo.
  • She was a renowned pioneer of women’s judo, being the first woman promoted to 6th dan (c. 1972), and later 9th dan (2006), by the Kodokan. She is also the first and, so far, only woman to have been promoted to 10th dan in the art.
  • After completing her formal education in Japan, Fukuda visited the United States of America to teach in the 1950s and 1960s, and eventually settled there. She continued to teach her art in the San Francisco Bay Area until her death in 2013.
  • Fukuda, standing at only 4’ 11” (150 cm) and weighing less than 100 lb. (45 kg), became a judo instructor in 1937. She also earned a degree in Japanese literature from Showa Women’s University.
  • In 1953, she was promoted to the rank of 5th dan in judo. She traveled to the United States of America later that year, at the invitation of a judo club in Oakland, California, and stayed for almost two years before returning to Japan. Fukuda next traveled to the US in 1966, giving seminars in California. At that time, she was one of only four women in the world ranked at 5th dan in judo, and was one of only two female instructors at the Kodokan (the other being Masako Noritomi, also ranked 5th dan).
  •  In 1966, she demonstrated her art at Mills College, and the institution immediately offered her a teaching position; she accepted, and taught there from 1967 to 1978.
  • Around 1972, following a letter campaign against the rule prohibiting women from being promoted higher than 5th dan, Fukuda became the first woman promoted to 6th dan by the Kodokan. In 1973, she published Born for the Mat: A Kodokan kata textbook for women, an instructional book for women about the kata (patterns) of Kodokan judo.
  • In 1974, she established the annual Joshi Judo Camp to give female judo practitioners the opportunity to train together. That year, she was one of only three women in the world ranked 6th dan in judo.
  • In 1990, she was awarded Japan’s Order of the Sacred Treasure, 4th Class (Gold Rays with Rosette), and the United States Judo Incorporated (USJI) Henry Stone Lifetime Contribution to American Judo Award.
  • She served as a technical adviser for US Women’s Judo and the USJI Kata Judges’ Certification Sub-committee, as a National Kata Judge, was a faculty member of the USJI National Teachers’ Institute, a member of the USJF Promotion Committee, a member of the USJF and USJI Women’s Sub-committee.
  • In 2001, she was awarded a rare red belt (marking 9th dan rank) in judo by the USJF for her lifelong contribution to the art. On January 8, 2006, at its annual New Year’s Kagami Biraki celebration, the Kodokan promoted Fukuda to the rank of 9th dan—the first time it had awarded this rank to a woman. On July 28, 2011, the promotion board of USA Judo awarded Fukuda the rank of 10th dan.
  • Fukuda continued to teach judo three times each week, host the annual Fukuda Invitational Kata Championships, and teach at the annual Joshi Judo Camp until her death, at the age of 99, in San Francisco, California.
  • She established the Keiko Fukuda Judo Scholarship to encourage and enable women to continue their formal training in the art. Apart from teaching in the USA, she also taught in Australia, Canada, France, Norway and the Philippines.

(via deliciouskaek)

(Source: nurgal, via femifeisty)

Teaching Chastity

Such an awesome segment from a local station here in SLC, Utah. Stick with it through Gale Ruzicka’s craziness, it gets good. It is great to have a feminist voice like Joanna Brooks in the LDS church. Subversive feminism fights on! 

Feminism has the potential to be greatly emancipatory by adopting an anti-racist, anti-homophobic, anti-transphobic and anti-Islamophobic rhetoric, instead of often actively being racist, homophobic, transphobic and Islamophobic. By clearly delineating the boundaries of what is “good” and “bad” feminism, Femen is using colonial feminist rhetoric that defines Arab women as oppressed by culture and religion, while no mention is made of capitalism, racism, or global imperialism. It is actively promoting the idea that Muslim women are suffering from “false consciousness” because they cannot see (while Femen can see) that the veil and religion are intrinsically harmful to all women.
Yet again, the lives of Muslim women are to be judged by European feminists, who yet again have decided that Islam – and the veil – are key components of patriarchy. Where do women who disagree with this fit? Where is the space for a plurality of voices? And the most important question of all: can feminism survive unless it sheds its Eurocentric bias and starts accepting that the experiences of all women should be seen as legitimate?